Denver Street Photography | Cvic Center Park

giant squid on thigh
a man with a head of toast
black and white sneakers

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Denver Street Photography | Civic Center Park

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Denver Street Photography |The Young Marines

confidence of youth
oblivious to wisdom
right behind your back

Young Marine Creed

1. Obey my parents and all others in charge of me whether young or old.
2. Keep myself neat at all times without other people telling me to.
3. Keep myself clean in mind by attending the church of my faith.
4. Keep my mind alert to learn in school, at home, or at play.
5. Remember having self-discipline will enable me to control my body and mind in case of an emergency.

I served in the Marine Corps between 1993 and 1997. My father was a Marine, and his father before him. I am proud of my service, yet I don’t talk about it as readily as I used to. When I was young, I just thought it was the right thing to do. To serve my country, to take an oath of service.

I, (NAME), do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God.

I received the Combat Action Ribbon for service in Operation United Shield. I did not discharge my weapon or engage in any hand to hand combat. I didn’t even learn that I had received the Combat Action Ribbon until years after I had been honorably discharged from service.

I am conflicted by this. I never mention it in person to anyone, because I don’t feel I deserved it. Yes, there were bullets that occasionally whizzed over my head on their way to some unknown destination, and there was a firefight on our way back to the ship, but I was not running for my life or anything. I was just in the right place at the right time.

I am conflicted by my feelings about life in general and how they relate to my past. I am non-religious, and I struggle to understand how so many people take their religion seriously enough to kill for it. I don’t pretend to have any idea if God is real, or how humankind came to be. Maybe God is real, maybe he (or she, or it) isn’t. So when I look at that oath, and think of how I swore to GOD that I would protect my country against all enemies, it just seems strange to me. What am I swearing to? To fight whoever they tell me is bad for the United States and its interests?

It seems as if I was bred for war, along with every other young man or woman from a family with a military background. It becomes a sort of right of passage, something I needed to do to prove to my dad and his brothers that I could be a Marine too. I didn’t hesitate, I didn’t think about dying, I just signed the papers and turned my life over to the Government.

The friendships and experiences I had in the Marines, I wouldn’t trade them for anything. That being said, I would not encourage my sons to join right now. I love them too much. I don’t even know who is good and who is bad anymore, it doesn’t seem so cut and dry. I thought about my daughter, and what I would say to her if she wanted to join in her future. Then I thought about the constant stories in the news of women in the military being raped, and I instantly knew that I would discourage her from taking that path.

I don’t want to fight anymore. I don’t want to feel angry all the time. I want to think about peace and promote it. I want to teach my children to be caring and compassionate towards other, to help their fellow man in any way they can.

I look at this picture, and I see those Young Marines, and how proud they are, and I read their creed, and I think to myself, these are all good traits to encourage in our youth. I look at this group here, and I wonder if any of them are destined for that wheelchair behind them or worse. For what? Fossil fuels? Water rights? Democracy? I want to fight for LOVE. I want to believe that fundamental changes in the way we live our lives is a real possibility. I want the human race to learn to co-operate the same way they are teaching my 3 year old. Everyone needs to share and take turns. We are not individuals, we are humans, all of us connected by that one common thread.

This is in no way meant to disrespect the Young Marines organization, the Marine Corps or our Government. The Young Marines goal is to keep kids off drugs and out of trouble. There is absolutely nothing wrong with that. These are just the questions I have but am scared to talk about to people in real life. So I put them on this blog to see if anyone else feels the same way I do. I am looking for that human connection, so I can feel like I belong. Maybe this is why change is so hard. I am struggling in the decision to post this entry, because I am worried about who I may offend, and what friends I might lose in the process. All of my fellow Marines that I served with have access to this blog. I feel like I am dishonoring myself and the Marine Corps by having these thoughts. That is how deep it is ingrained. That is why I am a skeptic, because I have experienced what it is to be a Marine first hand, and it isn’t easy or glamorous. It isn’t like the commercials you see when youre watching football. It is blood, sweat, and tears. Mental anguish.

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Denver Street Photography |The Young Marines

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Atomic Number 18

human connection
the quantum entanglement
Einstein is confused

“A dream you dream alone is only a dream. A dream you dream together is reality.” ― John Lennon

I believe the world needs to change. I am skeptical that it will happen before we destroy ourselves, but if you believe that everything is connected it seems logical that we could change our way of thinking collectively. We need each other to survive and thrive in this society. Love and compassion is the only way to achieve this. Good night or Good Morning depending on where you are. I hope this message of positivity finds you well. I’m no self help guru or wise philosopher, just a normal guy observing the world and contemplating how we can change it.

What is wrong with the world? I think the simple answer is US.

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Atomic Number 18

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Children enjoying the play area at the Southland Lifestyle Center.

A few thoughts about this image as I cannot for the life of me think of a haiku at the moment. Total haiku writer’s block this evening.

On a Sunday afternoon we headed out in search of a playground to let my daughter Penny “get her wiggles out”. We ended up at this water fountain and playground in a place called the Southland Lifestyle Center. The temperature was well into the 90’s and the fountain was bustling with kids looking to cool off.

What interested me in this image, is that the boy you see just under the armpit of the kid running through the frame was wheelchair bound. He had just gotten out of his wheelchair and was crawling around the play area. In my mind it was a nice moment to witness.

I imagined how it must feel to be bound to a wheelchair at such a young age, and I admired the boy’s perseverance and ability to enjoy life despite his disability. I’m glad my daughter was their to witness it, to get exposure to a child in a wheelchair and not have any preconceived notions about it. She played right alongside him as if nothing was different about him at all, and I am proud of her for that.

Normally I would not go into long detailed explanations about my images, as I feel there is some validity to the notion that good photography should stand on its own with no need for explanation. I think tonight I am just feeling unsure of myself. I’m having one of those moments as a photographer where I have a large body of images that I’m sort of drowning in. I think I might need a couple of years away from them in order to really understand and appreciate what I have.

I am emotionally attached to this image, which is why I think it’s good. I have an interest in Journalism and a desire to do something worthwhile with my passion for photography. I watched a documentary on Paul Strand this evening called Strand: Under the Dark Cloth , and I really enjoyed the story as well as his work. I thought he had a lot of very poignant things to say about being a photographer, and this is one of my favorites:

“Look at the things around you, the immediate world around you. If you are alive, it will mean something to you, and if you care enough about photography, and if you know how to use it, you will want to photograph that meaningness. If you let other people’s vision get between the world and your own, you will achieve that extremely common and worthless thing, a pictorial photograph.” – Paul Strand

I love this quote. As a student of photography it really hits home for me. It should serve as a reminder for us all. It’s okay to emulate your favorite photographer’s style, but remember to put your own stamp on it. Think about what you want to say about the world with your photography and put it out there. What is the worst that could happen? Someone will tell you it’s crap? Who cares. In the end someone is judging you no matter what, so just say whatever and put your art out there for the world to see.

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I’m Up Up and Away

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Denver Street Photography | Southlands

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Denver Street Photography | Southlands

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Denver Street Photography | Red Rocks College Station

One Direction fan
Union Jack in back pocket
calf high pink converse

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Denver Street Photography | Red Rocks College Station

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Summer

dog days of summer

kids running through the sprinklers

life isn’t that hard

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Focus

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